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Winter vine in a bucket - that's how it's done

Winter vine in a bucket - that's how it's done


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Even if it is not very well known, it is still possible: a vine can also be kept in a bucket. However, there are a number of things to consider when wintering.

Grapevine covered with snow

Holding a vine in a bucket is rather unusual, but it is still possible. If you choose to do this, it is only important that you choose a variety that remains small and does not proliferate as much. Then you can also cultivate the vine as a potted plant for several years. If you have the option, you should prefer to grow it in the garden (reading tip: planting vines - explained step by step). The vines can only properly develop their roots outdoors, so that they generally develop better. But as I said: it's not impossible!

Three forms of education for cultivation in the tub

If you decide on the culture in the bucket, three different forms of education can be considered.

  1. Mini vine - the smallest possible multi-year top vine for containers with a capacity of up to 10 liters
  2. Solid vine - for planters up to 20 liters / also perennial / based on various cordon shapes
  3. Magnificent vine - for planters of more than 10 liters / rarely gets older than one year

This is how vines are overwintered in the bucket

If you have planted a grapevine in a bucket, you must also think about winter protection. As a rule, most grapevines are absolutely frost hardy. They have to be if they grow outdoors. Temperatures down to -15 degrees should not be a problem. Lower temperatures are even important for the plants so that they do not sprout too early and then may die.

➤ Wintering outdoors:

You can definitely leave the vines in the bucket outside in winter. You then just have to make sure that you put the bucket in a protected place. If it gets extremely frosty, protect the plants with a layer of leaves or some brushwood for safety reasons.

➤ Wintering in the greenhouse:

You can also place the container plants in the greenhouse. You should then put them back outdoors from the end of February. If the vine has already formed buds, you have to wait until April / May, otherwise the frost could cause damage.

➤ Wintering in the basement:

You can overwinter grapevines in the bucket under certain conditions, but also in the cellar or another cool room. However, it is then important for the container vines that the temperature never rises above 12 degrees. Otherwise there is a risk of a premature budding and the shrinking of the plant. Therefore, always make sure that you do not heat your basement and constantly ventilate it.

Important: cut back grapevine strongly!

If you would like to take the container plant to a winter quarters, you must cut it back strongly beforehand. This pruning is used to regenerate the plant.



Comments:

  1. Adiv

    Excuse me, I have removed this message

  2. Teo

    Yes, it is written well, it really happens. How interesting, just yesterday I was grinding this topic with a friend while sitting in the kitchen with a glass of cognac.

  3. Sowi'ngwa

    I'm sorry, nothing I can not help you. But I am sure you will find the right solution.

  4. Yacoub

    And where do we stop?

  5. Mackendrick

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  6. Birkett

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  7. Dugrel

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  8. Wynfield

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